Hofstra University
Zarb School of Business
Hempstead, New York

Overview
The Zarb School of Business is a dynamic institution that focuses on teaching excellence. The School specializes in leveraging the combined resources of its location in proximity to the world center of business that is Manhattan and a safe, campus-based environment to offer students an outstanding experience. The School’s mission is closely tied to joining applicable theory with experiential focus, ensuring that graduate students develop a strong foundation for successful business careers. Classes are small; student activities that include a student consulting group, the M.B.A. Association, the Minority M.B.A. Association, International Students’ Organization, Graduate Women in Business, and the American Marketing Association, among others, offer excellent opportunities for social and professional development. The Zarb School is fully accredited by AACSB International-The Association to Advance Collegiate Schools of Business.

There are approximately 500 students currently enrolled in the M.B.A. Program, with an additional cohort of graduate students pursuing Master of Science degrees and Advanced Graduate Certificates. The student body is drawn from thirty-eight states and thirty-nine countries, allowing for a significant diversity of classroom discussion and sharing of perspectives. A full complement of career services is available to graduate students, including on- and off-campus recruiting programs, an alumni network, an annual resume book, and resume review and referral.

The Location and Community
Hofstra is located approximately 25 miles east of New York City, the world center of banking, finance, advertising, communications, transportation, fashion, and culture. The University’s location in suburban Long Island provides students with an ideal, quiet academic retreat and a gateway to the wealth of professional, academic, and cultural opportunities that abound in Manhattan. Numerous cultural and sports activities, lecture series, and scholarly conferences are sponsored by the University each year.

Programs of Study and Degree Requirements
Courses in the Zarb M.B.A. Program expose students to innovative strategies, group interaction, and simulated business situations. The curriculum emphasizes a cross-functional approach to teaching. Major areas of concentration include accounting, banking and finance, business computer information systems, international business, management, marketing, and taxation. The regular M.B.A. Program is two full academic years. Classes may be attended in the day or evening, on either a full-time or a part-time basis.

Facilities & Resources
The University has a number of outstanding research facilities, which are available to students in its graduate programs. The University libraries’ collections number approximately 1.6 million volumes and extensive resources in nonprint media. Library holdings can be searched through Lexicat, the online public catalog, at http://Lexicat.hofstra.edu. The library Web page provides links to a wide range of online full-text and abstract/indexing databases. University libraries participate in the Online Computer Library Center (OCLC) network of 41,000 libraries in eighty-one countries. The OCLC computer database contains bibliographic and cataloguing information about the holdings of member libraries and provides extensive research and interlibrary loan data. A number of programs have dedicated computer laboratories, which are supplemented by several open-access computer laboratories on campus.

Hofstra’s computer facilities comprise several computer labs that are connected to the University’s computer network to provide easy access to all systems from various locations on the campus.

The Merrill Lynch Center for the Study of International Financial Services and Markets at the Zarb School promotes and facilitates research and innovation in the field of international services and markets and is funded by Merrill Lynch.

Expenses and Aid
Graduate tuition is $870 per credit hour. University fees ranged from $80 to $450 per semester, depending upon the number of credits taken.

Financial Aid:
Academic scholarships, research assistantships, fellowships, and need-based awards are available to full-time students. Special scholarship programs are available for minority students. All students applying for financial aid file the Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA)..

Housing/Living Expenses:
The cost of accommodations was $3975 per semester for University apartments, $4100 per semester for single-occupancy residence hall rooms, $3525 per semester for double-occupancy suites, and $5350 per semester for a New Complex super single. The Office of Residential Life maintains listings of available accommodations for students who wish to live off campus.

How to Apply / Application
New students are admitted to the M.B.A. program in the fall, spring, and summer semesters of each year. To apply, applicants must submit official undergraduate transcript(s), letter(s) of recommendation, the Graduate Application for Admission, and a nonrefundable $60 application fee. The Zarb School M.B.A. program also requires results of the GMAT. International students are required to provide proof of English language proficiency by presenting recent results of the TOEFL with a minimum score of 550.

Hofstra accepts applications for admission on a rolling basis beginning in January for the fall semester and October for the spring semester. While international applicants are required to apply by April 15 for the fall semester and November 1 for the spring semester, all applicants are encouraged to apply by these dates. To secure a place in the program, a $250 deposit is requested by June 1 for fall admission and January 1 for spring admission. Applicants may file online or by using a paper application.

Who to Contact
Frank G. Zarb School of Business
Hofstra University
302 Weller Hall
Hempstead, New York 11549

516-463-5683

E-mail: humba@hofstra.edu

Web site home page

Graduate Departments and Faculty

Accounting, Taxation, and Legal Studies in Business
• Anthony Basile, Assistant Professor; Ph.D., NYU, 2001; CPA.

• Stuart L. Bass, Associate Professor; J.D., Hofstra, 1979; MPA.

• Jacqueline A. Burke, Assistant Professor; Ph.D., NYU, 2000; CPA.

• Robert Fonfeder, Professor; Ph.D., CUNY, Baruch; CPA.

• Richard C. Jones, Associate Professor; Ph.D., Rutgers, 2001; CPA.

• Robert Katz, Professor; LL.M., NYU, 1971. Cheryl R. Lehman,

• Louis J. Papa, Assistant Professor; J.D., Brooklyn Law School, 1984; M.B.A., CUNY, Baruch, 1989.

• Barbara Patton, Assistant Professor; J.D., Hofstra, 1982.

• Steven T. Petra, Associate Professor; Ph.D., Rutgers, 2002; CPA.

• Nathan S. Slavin, Associate Professor; Ph.D., CUNY, Baruch, 1980; CPA.

• Elizabeth K. Venuti, Assistant Professor; Ph.D., 1997, Columbia; CPA.

• Paul D. Warner, Professor; J.D., 1958, Ph.D., 1981, NYU.

• Martha S. Weisel, Associate Professor; J.D., St. John’s (New York), 1981.

Business Computer Information Systems and Quantitative Methods
• John F. Affisco, Professor; Ph.D., CUNY Graduate Center, 1981.

• Meral Binbasioglu, Associate Professor; Ph.D., NYU, 1986.

• Mahesh Chandra, Associate Professor; George Washington, D.Sc., 1978.

• Steven T. Cosares, Associate Professor; Ph.D., Berkeley, 1988.

• Bernard H. Dickman, Associate Professor; Ph.D., NYU, 1970.

• Farrokh Guiahi, Associate Professor; Ph.D., Stanford, 1975.

• John A. Hardiman, Special Assistant Professor; M.S., Polytechnic, 1970; Ph.D., St. John’s (New York), 1978.

• Esther E. Klein, Assistant Professor; Ph.D., CUNY Graduate Center, 1996.

• Laura H. Lally, Associate Professor; Ph.D., NYU, 1992.

• Farrokh Nasri, Professor; Ph.D., CUNY, Baruch, 1986.

• M. Javad Paknejad, Professor; Ph.D., CUNY Graduate Center, 1986.

• Najib Saylani, Assistant Professor; Ph.D., CUNY Graduate Center, 2000.

• David N. Sessions, Associate Professor; Ph.D., NYU, 1987.

• Deb Sledgianowski, Assistant Professor; M.B.A., Pace, 1997.

• Khalid S. Soliman, Assistant Professor; M.B.A., Murray State, 1993.

• Nancy Stern, Professor; Ph.D., SUNY at Stony Brook, 1978.

• Lonnie K. Stevans, Associate Professor; Ph.D., Oklahoma State, 1983.

• Mohammed H. A. Tafti, Professor; D.B.A., George Washington, 1984.

• Elaine R. Winston, Assistant Professor; M.Phil., CUNY, Baruch, 1998.

Finance
• Rahul K. Bishnoi, Associate Professor; Ph.D., Massachussetts Amherst, 1984.

• Robert D. Campbell, Associate Professor; Ph.D., Connecticut, 1999.

• Ahmet S. Cebenoyan, Professor; Ph.D., NYU, 1986.

• Nancy A. Huckins, Associate Professor; Ph.D., CUNY Graduate Center, 1992.

• Ahmet K. Karagozoglu, Assistant Professor; Ph.D., CUNY, Baruch, 1999.

• Wi Saeng Kim, Associate Professor; Ph.D., Georgia State, 1981.

• Steven B. Krull, Associate Professor; Ph.D., CUNY, Baruch, 1990.

• Esmeralda O. Lyn, Professor; Ph.D., CUNY, Baruch, 1982.

• Ehsan Nikbakht, Professor; D.B.A., George Washington, 1981.

• George J. Papaioannou, Professor; Ph.D., Penn State, 1979.

• Anoop Rai, Professor; Ph.D., Indiana Bloomington, 1987.

• Andrew C. Spieler, Assistant Professor; Ph.D., SUNY at Binghamton, 2001.

• Kalpathy G. Viswanathan, Associate Professor; Ph.D., Tennessee, Knoxville, 1991.

• Edward J. Zychowicz, Associate Professor; Ph.D., SUNY at Binghamton, 1989.

• Mauritz D. Blonder, Associate Professor; Ph.D., CUNY, Baruch, 1976.

Management, Entrepreneurship, and General Business
• Elizabeth Boyle, Assistant Professor; M.B.A., 1989, M.Phil., 2001, NYU.

• Jeff Brice, Assistant Professor; Ph.D., Mississippi State, 2002.

• Richard Buda, Associate Professor; Ph.D., Stevens, 1984.

• Tugba Cayirli, Special Assistant Professor; M.B.A., CUNY, Baruch, 2001.

• Bruce H. Charnov, Associate Professor; Ph.D., U.S. International, 1976; J.D., Hofstra, 1990.

• Debra R. Comer, Professor; Ph.D., Yale, 1986.

• Mamdouh I. Farid, Associate Professor; Ph.D., CUNY, Baruch, 1988.

• David M. Flynn, Professor; Ph.D., Massachussetts Amherst, 1979.

• Li-Lian Gao, Associate Professor; Ph.D., Indiana Bloomington, 1989.

• Brad D. Geiger, Special Assistant Professor; M.B.A., Kutztown, 1998.

• Wayne Grossman, Assistant Professor; Ph.D., Texas A&M, 1996.

• Harold Lazarus, Professor; Ph.D., Columbia, 1963.

• Janet A. Lenaghan, Instructor; M.B.A., Hofstra, 1992.

• Tara J. Radin, Assistant Professor; J.D., 1993, Ph.D., 1999, Virginia.

• Kaushik Sengupta, Assistant Professor; Ph.D., Indiana Bloomington, 1997.

• Charles H. Smith, Associate Professor; Ph.D., Syracuse, 1985.

• Matthew C. Sonfield, Professor; Ph.D., NYU, 1976.

Marketing and International Business
• Benny Z. Barak, Associate Professor; Ph.D., CUNY Graduate Center, 1979.

• Barry Berman, Professor; Ph.D., CUNY Graduate Center. 1973.

• Claudia A. Cafarelli, Special Instructor; M.B.A., CUNY, Baruch, 1996.

• Joel R. Evans, Professor; Ph.D., CUNY Graduate Center, 1975.

• Andrew M. Forman, Associate Professor; Ph.D., Tennessee, 1985.

• Tao Gao, Assistant Professor; Ph.D., Virginia Tech, 1998.

• William L. James, Professor; Ph.D., Purdue, 1981.

• Keun S. Lee, Associate Professor; D.B.A., Kentucky, 1987.

• Charles A. McMellon, Assistant Professor; Ph.D., CUNY Graduate Center, 1997.

• Rusty M. Moore, Associate Professor; Ph.D., Tufts, 1969.

• James P. Neelankavil, Professor; Ph.D., NYU, 1976.

• Elaine Sherman, Professor; Ph.D., CUNY, Baruch, 1983.

• Shawn T. Thelen, Assistant Professor; Ph.D., Old Dominion, 2002.

• Gladys M. Torres-Baumgarten, Assistant Professor; Ph.D., Rutgers, 2002.

• Boonghee Yoo, Associate Professor; Ph.D., Georgia State, 1996.

• Yong Zhang, Associate Professor; Ph.D., Houston, 1992.

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